Project Description

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Concept sketch

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Drawing by Mark Bruce

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Visualisation by Mark Bruce

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Paul Chapman Images

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Right Here Right Now – Children and Young People Seen and Heard

Thylacine’s role

  • concept design
“In developing the Right Here Right Now project, we had a vision of a large scale artwork incorporating self portraits and messages from children and young people, to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Rights of the Child. Caolan and Alex at Thylacine worked with us to turn this idea into an exciting design, which became a spectacular art installation, on a tight budget. Thylacine helped us to adapt our ideas to a change of location, and developed the DNA spiral design. This was a perfect fit for the Fitters Workshop space and the concept of our project, symbolising the unique contribution made by each child and young person to our ACT community.”
GABRIELLE McKINNON, SENIOR ADVISOR, CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE, ACT Human Rights Commission

A temporary installation, Fitters Workshop Kingston, Canberra

To mark the 25th Anniversary of the Convention on the Rights of the Child on 20th November 2014, children and young people in the ACT were invited to create a self portrait and respond to the provocation of ‘why adults should listen to children’. 11,500 self portraits combined with texts were received from students at 50 schools across the ACT.

Responding to the concept of each child and young person being a unique individual we designed a double helix form, the shape of human DNA, constructed from hundreds of recyclable cardboard boxes. The installation was designed to be environmentally friendly and easy for young people to construct out of 600 boxes and sticky tape.

The project was launched during Youth Week in April 2015 by Children and Young People’s Commissioner Alasdair Roy.

Project partners included Children & Young People Commissioner’s office of the ACT Human Rights Commission, the Children and Young people of Canberra, Directorate of Education and Training, architect Mark Bruce. Sponsored by Visy.

10 – 12 April 2015